Monday, July 22, 2013

President Trayvon

Barry Soetoro addresses the dinosaur media.


I send my thoughts and prayers, as well as Michelle’s, to the family of Trayvon Martin, and to remark on the incredible grace and dignity with which they’ve dealt with the entire situation. I can only imagine what they’re going through, and it’s remarkable how they’ve handled it.

"Detroit just declared bankruptcy, we have a sin debt of over 16 trillion, worthless currency is being printed by the kosher money manipulators right this very moment and we're involved in Syria for no good reason. Still, I think it's important I use this opportunity to fuel the undeclared, one-sided race war and encourage racially motivated attacks on Whites."

The judge conducted the trial in a professional manner. The prosecution and the defense made their arguments. The juries were properly instructed that in a case such as this, reasonable doubt was relevant, and they rendered a verdict. And once the jury’s spoken, that’s how our system works.

"We're working hard to get rid of the rule of law, but it apparently still exists." What, no "they acted stupidly?"

"Another way of saying that is Trayvon Martin could have been me 35 years ago."

Our president, thirty five years ago.

There are very few African-American men in this country who haven’t had the experience of being followed when they were shopping in a department store. That includes me.

Sadly we don't get any apocryphal tales of being attacked by "The Klan" or the tear-jerker about some negro who hadn't been formally convicted of a crime he almost certainly committed being lynched 130 years ago. The new lynching is department store security doing their job. 

This is very sad. Clearly the answer is to remove "African Americans" from White nations so they don't have to face the horrible racism of someone silently watching them. 

And there are very few African-American men who haven’t had the experience of walking across the street and hearing the locks click on the doors of cars.

Racist locks! We need lock control because they make negroes feel bad. Whitey, unlock your car and house. You'll be fine, I promise.

There are very few African-Americans who haven’t had the experience of getting on an elevator and a woman clutching her purse nervously and holding her breath until she had a chance to get off. That happens often.

Note the bizarre, sexual language. White women "holding their breath" and "getting off" around the negro monster. Even in a "Whitey bad" speech there's no resisting the urge to push miscegenation.

Also, stop trying to protect yourselves White women. Negroes aren't going to attack you.

The African-American community is also knowledgeable that there is a history of racial disparities in the application of our criminal laws, everything from the death penalty to enforcement of our drug laws.

Laws are racist. Locks are racist. Department store loss prevention is racist. Common sense self-defense measures are racist. Racist, racist, racist...

Then we print a pile of worthless money...

Now, this isn’t to say that the African-American community is naive about the fact that African-American young men are disproportionately involved in the criminal justice system, that they are disproportionately both victims and perpetrators of violence. It’s not to make excuses for that fact, although black folks do interpret the reasons for that in a historical context.

"I understand that thanks to internet bloggers I can't just tell you a series of marxist lies. Yeah, negroes do have the lower I.Q., the poor impulse control, the propensity to violence and commit about seven to ten times the violent crime that Whites commit. Even that is a conservative estimate. I'm not making excuses for this, even though this entire speech up until this point has been nothing but excuses and "poor me" tall tales."

We understand that some of the violence that takes place in poor black neighborhoods around the country is born out of a very violent past in this country, and that the poverty and dysfunction that we see in those communities can be traced to a very difficult history.

The same discredited marxist lies. Does anyone still believe this? 

So folks understand the challenges that exist for African-American boys, but they get frustrated, I think, if they feel that there’s no context for it or that context is being denied. And that all contributes, I think, to a sense that if a white male teen was involved in the same kind of scenario, that, from top to bottom, both the outcome and the aftermath might have been different.


Now, the question for me at least, and I think, for a lot of folks is, where do we take this? How do we learn some lessons from this and move in a positive direction? I think it’s understandable that there have been demonstrations and vigils and protests, and some of that stuff is just going to have to work its way through as long as it remains nonviolent. If I see any violence, then I will remind folks that that dishonors what happened to Trayvon Martin and his family.


When I was in Illinois I passed racial profiling legislation. And it actually did just two simple things. One, it collected data on traffic stops and the race of the person who was stopped. But the other thing was it resourced us into training police departments across the state on how to think about potential racial bias and ways to further professionalize what they were doing.

Now Chicago is doing better than ever, thanks to this communist nonsense that makes it difficult for officers to actually do their jobs. 

Along the same lines, I think it would be useful for us to examine some state and local laws to see if they are designed in such a way that they may encourage the kinds of altercations and confrontations and tragedies that we saw in the Florida case, rather than diffuse potential altercations.

Take your guns. Take your rights. 


If we’re sending a message as a society in our communities that someone who is armed potentially has the right to use those firearms even if there’s a way for them to exit from a situation, is that really going to be contributing to the kind of peace and security and order that we’d like to see?

In other news White man Joshua Chellew was attacked by four negroes and then thrown into traffic where he was run over and killed. This story has received zero national media attention. Another unarmed, White victim of racially-motivated negro pack attacks. Down the memory hole. Joshua Chellew could have been me. He could have been any White person. 

And for us to be able to gather together business leaders and local elected officials and clergy and celebrities and athletes and figure out how to do a better job helping young African-American men feel that they’re a full part of this society and that they’ve got pathways and avenues to succeed, I think that would be a pretty good outcome from what was obviously a tragic situation.

Let's waste more time and money in the vain hope that we can make good little citizens out of the negro. There were no business leaders or "celebrities" or "athletes" for Pat Mahaney, a White Man who was brutalized in another black pack attack. He never recovered and died a year later. The six brown animals claimed "boredom" as their motive. If only there had been "celebrities" to entertain them and teach them "randomly attacking da White Debil be bad, nomesayin?" 

And then finally, I think it’s going to be important for all of us to do some soul-searching. There has been talk about convening a (national) conversation on race.


As difficult and challenging as this whole episode has been for a lot of people, I don’t want us to lose sight that things are getting better. Each successive generation seems to be making progress in changing attitudes when it comes to race. I doesn’t mean that we’re in a postracial society. It doesn’t mean that racism is eliminated.

We'll just keep ignoring all those attacks on Whites. Things are great! 

And so we have to be vigilant and we have to work on these issues, and those of us in authority should be doing everything we can to encourage the better angels of our nature as opposed to using these episodes to heighten divisions. But we should also have confidence that kids these days I think have more sense than we did back then, and certainly more than our parents did or our grandparents did, and that along this long, difficult journey, we’re becoming a more perfect union -- not a perfect union, but a more perfect union.

Cry me a river.

1 comment:

  1. "we're involved in Syria for no good reason. "

    Other than to drag Iran in to war via their mutual defence pact. A perfectly good reason for the Kosher crowd.

    ReplyDelete